Asbestos Exposure and Coronavirus

While the coronavirus pandemic continues to cause great concern, especially among the elderly and immunocompromised to catching the virus, many residents who have experienced exposure to asbestos may feel even more at risk.

The advent of COVID-19 only made a vulnerable population even more susceptible and combining asbestos exposure with it only makes things worse.

What is Asbestos?

Asbestos is a naturally occurring mineral that is noted for being fire-resistant. For many decades, asbestos was used in many buildings, factories, plants, and even housing units for its fire-resistant properties. It’s even been used in products containing talc, such as baby and body powders. 

While the first indications of the dangers associated with asbestos arose in the 1920s, it was not until the 1970s that the mineral was banned across the US. Today, there are still many buildings that were built in the 1970s or earlier that contain asbestos.  

Asbestos and Coronavirus

People who have been exposed to asbestos, even if they have not developed mesothelioma or other lung-related issues, are vulnerable to the effects of COVID-19. This is because asbestos in the lungs damages the tissues, making viruses that cause respiratory problems more of a threat. For anyone who may have been exposed to asbestos, it raises the risk of complications caused by COVID-19.  

That makes it even more imperative to hire a professional company to inspect and remove any asbestos in your home or business. 

How Brickley Environmental Can Help

If you suspect that your home or business contains asbestos, call the professionals at Brickley Environmental. Armed with the knowledge, experience, and tools to identify and remove asbestos, Brickley Environmental offers its professional services to businesses and homeowners. 

Call today and the staff at Brickley Environmental will listen to your needs, explain our services, and conduct a proper inspection of your facility, building, or home at your request. Given the dangers of asbestos, it is best to act as soon as possible to protect those who live or work inside. 

For more information on asbestos, click here to visit the EPA website.

paint over the danger of lead

Protect Your Family From Exposure to Lead

paint over the danger of lead

Lead contamination has been in the news recently, most notably in cities where the water supply have been tainted by the presence of lead. However, one of the most common sources of lead contamination originates from lead paint that was used in homes prior to 1978. The dust from that lead paint is one of the most common sources of lead poisoning which affects families around the world.

Any lead paint that was used in homes prior to 1978 may be under several layers of newer, non-lead paints. As long as the newer paint is still intact, then the lead is most likely under control. However, it is when the newer paint ages and deteriorates that lead contamination becomes a problem. This is particularly true around windows, door frames, and stairs as children may lick or chew on these areas.

Other sources of lead include pipes and plumbing materials which were commonly made from lead until 1986. In addition, lead dust that is tracked into the home from the outside, usually from exterior lead paints, industrial pollution, and even old gasoline that contained lead.

How to Protect from Lead Exposure

To keep you and your family safe from lead exposure, you should take the following steps:

Remove Your Shoes & Wash Your Hands. You can minimize the tracking of lead dust from outside your home by removing your shoes as you enter the home. This means that whatever lead dust is on your shoes stays near the door and is not tracked inside. Plus, washing your hands will remove any particles that might be present. It’s also good hygiene that can lower the risk of catching a cold, flu, or virus.

Plant Bushes Around the Home.  This keeps kids from playing next to the home where old lead paint may be present. This minimizes the possibility of lead dust coming into contact with children when playing outdoors.

Maintain the Condition of Your Property. If you add new layers of paint when needed, inspect the water supply coming into your home, and keep aware of any news reports of possible lead contamination, you can minimize the danger.

Have Your Home and Property Inspected. If your home was built before 1978 and you do not know what paints were used at that time, then you should have it inspected for the presence of lead. This means contacting a professional company that has a stellar reputation and experience in identifying and removing lead from the home.

How Brickley Environmental Can Help

If you suspect that your home may be contaminated with lead, contact the professionals at Brickley Environmental. We have the knowledge and experience to identify and remove lead contamination that may be present. Over the years, we have worked with home and business owners just like you to ensure that their properties are safe from lead contamination.

Call our offices today and we will listen to your concerns, explain our services, and inspect your property at your convenience. At Brickley Environmental, we understand the dangers of lead contamination and what it can do to the health of those living or working on the property.

Open Windows Can Let in Fresh Air … And Surprisingly Lead too!

The recent events in Flint, Michigan have led many families to become concerned about the drinking water in their homes. However, they may be overlooking another source of lead that is coming in through their open windows. 

 Lead may still be present in the paint and wood of homes in the US that were constructed before 1978. Every time a window is opened, the fine lead dust is disturbed.  Children are especially vulnerable. They are closer to the ground and more likely to inhale or consume the dust that forms along the windows.

How to Address Lead in the Home

The first step is whether the home was built before 1978. This is a time when lead was legally used in paint. Lead gave paint considerable durability and it was cheap, so it was commonly used up until that year. if your home was built before that time, then consider having a professional service inspect and test the home for the presence of lead paint, even if it has been covered over for many years.

There are a few other materials in the home that may also be made with lead. This includes certain toys, jewelry, and imported candies. Continued exposure can build up the presence of lead over time. Here are some basic things you can do which may help reduce the lead exposure in your home.

Replace the windows.
Check the Water for Lead: Especially Hot Water.
Clean More Frequently: To Reduce the Amount of Dust.
Look for Peeling Paint: Underneath may be a source for lead.

There is no known treatment for the effects of lead-poisoning. Too much exposure may lead to lifelong health, cognitive, and behavior issues that can never be properly treated. This is especially true for children who are even more susceptible to the effects of lead poisoning. This means that cleaning and replacing windows may either not be enough or you may be looking in the wrong direction.

It is best to call a professional company that has experience with its identification and removal if you believe lead may be present.

Why Call Brickley Environmental?

Call the professionals at Brickley Environmental if you believe that lead may be coming into your home in the air or through the water pipes. They offer their extensive knowledge, years of experience, and complete training to identify sources of lead and remove it from the home, office, or facility.

Asbestos Causing Unnecessary Loss of Life in the U.S.

Montana Senator Jon Tester introduced a bill to ban all use of asbestos in the United States. His action, which was joined by 8 other senators, reflects the growing concern about the presence of asbestos. Montana has been hit especially hard with asbestos-related diseases and deaths, which resulted from a vermiculite mine in the Troy and Libby areas.

The W.R. Grace Mining Disaster

In 1963, the Zonolite mining operations took hold in the Libby area of Montana. The mine was massive, producing about 80 percent of the vermiculite used around the world. However, the asbestos-laden dust produced by the mine spread across the Libby and Troy areas, blanketing the communities located within the zone.

Even before the mine was shut down in 1990, the extent of the damage was well-known. Not only the workers in the mine were being affected, but it was also their family and friends who were exposed to the asbestos dust from the clothing of the employees. By the late 1980s, the state itself was being sued from those suffering from asbestosis, but the true size and scope of the disaster were not really known until a decade later.

In 1999, a series of revealing articles by the Seattle Post-Intelligencer demonstrated the true gravity of the situation. Today, more than 1,000 people have been diagnosed with asbestos-related lung disorders, and more people continue to be diagnosed and die from the condition each week.

The EPA had declared the area a Superfund site, and twenty years later, the work continues to clean up the area.  The dangers to the public about the release of asbestos-laden dust is still present. And while much has been done to ensure the site is safe, there is still considerably more work to do.

In the US, about 39,000 people every year succumb to diseases related to asbestos exposure. With exposure being preventable, more work is still needed to clean up asbestos from Montana and the rest of the US. The chances of the bill introduced by Tester may be slim, especially given President Trump’s approval of the use of asbestos “when properly applied”.

However, as the people living in the Libby and Troy areas learned over the past few decades, taking action against asbestos exposure needs to be swift and direct. Otherwise, more people will die from asbestos-related lung issues.

How Brickley Environmental is Here for You

If you suspect that your home, building, or facility may have asbestos materials, call the professionals at Brickley Environmental. We have the tools, equipment, knowledge, and experience to inspect, locate, and properly remove the asbestos in a safe manner.

Link Between Lead Exposure and Heart Disease

Since the 1970s, lead has been banned for use in paints, gasoline, and many other products because of its effects on the brain. However, its connection to heart disease has only recently been revealed.

A recent observational study from The Lancet Public Health Journal revealed that 256,000 cases of premature death caused by cardiovascular disease in the US may be linked to lead exposure. This new study defies the notion that low levels of lead exposure had little to no effect on premature death.

Presence of Lead and the Circulatory System

Lead exposure is linked to the hardening of the arteries, high blood pressure, and ischemic or coronary heart disease. Lead exposure occurs because lead has not fully been removed from some of the paints, fuel, and plumbing of structures, especially from older homes and buildings.

Most of the premature deaths caused by lead exposure affected those middle-aged, roughly 44 years old and older in the US. While exposure to lead products has been greatly reduced over the past few decades, it has yet to be eliminated from most of the western world.

Of the participants from The Lancet Public Health Journal study, those who had the highest levels of lead in their systems tended to be male, less educated, more likely to smoke, and have additional health complications, such as diabetes or hypertension. In addition, 37 percent of the participants who had the highest levels of lead were more likely to pass away prematurely compared to similar individuals with a far lower presence of lead in their systems.

Overall, the study concludes that 256,000 premature deaths might have been avoided if the levels of lead in their systems were at normal levels. Across age, sex, and health lines, the presence of lead has a substantial effect on the health and wellbeing of the body and mind. In addition, the study calls into question the assumed safe levels of lead in terms of its link to cardiovascular disease.

How Brickley Environmental Can Help

If you believe that your residence or business may have lead paint or materials made from lead, please call the experts at Brickley Environmental. We have the knowledge, training, and equipment to safely remove the lead from your home, office, or facility.