Sustainable Management of C&D Materials

Construction and demolition materials, often known as C&D materials, consist of the basic products used to create residences, buildings, and structures. These materials are used during the construction process, which subsequently means they will have to be broken apart during the demolition phase. 

The result is that such materials will need to be properly disposed of. Quite often during the construction process, materials will be leftover and not used. Such materials include but are not limited to:

  • Asphalt, concrete and bricks or masonry
  • Wood, gypsum, and glass
  • Metal, plastics, and other components

Other components often consist of items salvaged from other projects, such as doors, plumbing, and the like. There are also natural materials that are removed from the property for the purposes of construction, such as soil, trees, stumps, and rocks. 

Amount of C&D Material Debris

In the US alone, the amount of C&D material either created by demolition or leftover from construction is estimated to be 600 million tons each year. This is more than twice the amount of municipal solid waste that is generated. 

It is true that demolition is responsible for around 90% of the C&D material produced. Roughly 455 million tons were reused in some manner with the remaining being sent to landfills. 

Benefits of Reducing C&D Material Disposal

While a considerable amount of C&D material is being reused or repurposed, there are still nearly 145 million tons that are not. The advantages of reducing the amount of material generated are considerable. These include:

  • Fewer disposal facilities
  • Reduce building & demolition expenses
  • Offset environmental impact
  • Reduce use of landfill space 

Creating less overall waste is also beneficial because certain types of waste materials simply cannot be repurposed. By reducing the amount that is generated, more can be repurposed or recycled. This also helps the environment. 

In addition to the cleaner air, land, and waterways, the reduction of C&D materials provides benefits across the board. By focusing on how much C&D materials are used, the construction process can become more efficient and waste less material. For demolition practices, finding ways to properly reuse or repurpose materials leads to greater efficiency, less waste, and more jobs as companies form.

How Brickley Environmental Can Help

For those who are interested in the proper disposal of construction and demolition materials, Brickley Environmental has the knowledge, experience, and equipment to do the job. Over the years, Brickley Environmental has helped many home and business owners dispose of unwanted materials, including those used in construction and demolition. 

Call today and find out more about how Brickley Environmental can help you clean up a construction or demolition site. Contact us today and discover what Brickley Environmental can offer you. 

For more information on sustainable management of construction and demolition materials, click here to visit the EPA website.

The World Has an E-Waste Problem

What was once an issue that barely caused a ripple is now being seen as a major problem. Electronic waste or E-Waste has increased many-fold over the past few years. Currently, around six million pounds of discarded electronic devices are being processed each month at one plant in Fresno run by ERI. That is a fraction of what is being discarded by Americans every month. 

With a new generation of 5G devices, the number of devices that will soon be hitting the recycling bins will be astounding. And while it is good that many of these devices will either be recycled whole or have their important components such as aluminum, copper, and steel removed so they can be reused, it is still a massive issue. 

Why E-Waste is Growing

The answer is simple, the thirst for the latest, fastest electronics means that more people are getting rid of their older ones even if they still are in good condition. Consider that from 2010 to 2017, Americans increased their spending on new communication devices and telephones almost five times over. However, the $71 billion spent in 2017 may be dwarfed by the amount that will be spent on a new generation of devices that promises even faster download speeds. 

The introduction of 5G will result in a changeover of devices that may be on a greater scale compared to when people switched from black and white televisions to color. This transition is great for businesses that produce 5G devices but represents a massive challenge for the proper recycling and disposal of older gadgets, mobile devices, and other components that are not up to the 5G standards. 

Hazardous Waste From Electronic Devices

You may be surprised to learn about the hazardous materials found inside many devices. Substances such as mercury and beryllium pose dangers to the health of the environment and all living things that come into contact with these materials. Although their presence in individual devices is quite small and generally harmless, when added together with other disposed materials, it represents a significant problem. 

Currently, only 19 states have laws governing the disposal of E-Waste. This means 31 states in which electronic waste can be dumped into landfills. Even in the states that ban such practices, it is left to the consumer to properly dispose of or recycle their old devices. 

One way to address the situation is to make electronic devices sturdier and more resilient. This means having batteries that can easily be replaced. Modern rechargeable batteries are often good for only two years. Not being able to replace them only sends the devices to the garbage bin. 

That is why better solutions are needed if business owners and consumers are to address the growing issue of electronic waste.  

How Brickley Environmental Can Help

If you are facing a situation with electronic waste or E-Waste, Brickley Environmental has the knowledge, experience, and equipment needed to help solve your problem. We offer a wide range of waste management solutions in the Southern California area.

For more information on E-Waste, click here to visit the EPA website.

Recycling Programs Initiated for Unwanted Electronic Equipment and Styrofoam Products

Recently, the residents of Berkeley Heights, New Jersey, gained access to a new, free recycling center for unwanted electronic devices and some forms of Styrofoam. Thanks to a grant by the Environmental Commission, this new program promises to be more convenient for residents to dispose of unwanted waste materials.

Electronic Devices

The devices that qualify for proper recycling in the new facility include, but is not limited to, the following:

  • Monitors, televisions, and computers
  • Tablets, laptops, and e-readers
  • Printers, copy machines, and fax machines

Before dropping off your electronic items for recycling, you may want to consider selling or donating the ones that are still in working condition. There are several places that accept donations where people can use electronic devices for their needs. In some cases, you may want to remove all your information from the drive itself.

Given the amount of electronic waste in the US, having a place to recycle such devices provides the citizens of Berkeley Heights a way to get rid of the unwanted materials with a clear conscious. It also provides a means to recycle parts, wiring, and components into new products. This approach will help save money over the long run by reusing old materials.

Styrofoam

A new recycling program for products made from Styrofoam has also been launched in Berkeley Heights. The products that may be recycled should have all adhesives, stickers, and tape removed before disposing of. Some of the products that qualify include the following:

  • Packaging foam for furniture and appliances
  • Block form foam
  • White clean foam

Be advised that there are several products made from Styrofoam that cannot be included for recycling purposes, such as foodservice foam, dark-colored foam, egg cartons, peanut foam, cardboard foam, and foam that is dirty or wet.

This may be of concern to residents who have considerable amounts of Styrofoam products but cannot have them recycled because of the additional inks and coloring that is present. This is why egg cartons are not allowed even though they are mostly made from Styrofoam.

Brickley Environmental Offers Answers

If you have questions about what to do with the waste generated by Styrofoam or old electronic devices in your residence, office, or facility, call Brickley Environmental today and get the answers you need.