paint over the danger of lead

Protect Your Family From Exposure to Lead

paint over the danger of lead

Lead contamination has been in the news recently, most notably in cities where the water supply have been tainted by the presence of lead. However, one of the most common sources of lead contamination originates from lead paint that was used in homes prior to 1978. The dust from that lead paint is one of the most common sources of lead poisoning which affects families around the world.

Any lead paint that was used in homes prior to 1978 may be under several layers of newer, non-lead paints. As long as the newer paint is still intact, then the lead is most likely under control. However, it is when the newer paint ages and deteriorates that lead contamination becomes a problem. This is particularly true around windows, door frames, and stairs as children may lick or chew on these areas.

Other sources of lead include pipes and plumbing materials which were commonly made from lead until 1986. In addition, lead dust that is tracked into the home from the outside, usually from exterior lead paints, industrial pollution, and even old gasoline that contained lead.

How to Protect from Lead Exposure

To keep you and your family safe from lead exposure, you should take the following steps:

Remove Your Shoes & Wash Your Hands. You can minimize the tracking of lead dust from outside your home by removing your shoes as you enter the home. This means that whatever lead dust is on your shoes stays near the door and is not tracked inside. Plus, washing your hands will remove any particles that might be present. It’s also good hygiene that can lower the risk of catching a cold, flu, or virus.

Plant Bushes Around the Home.  This keeps kids from playing next to the home where old lead paint may be present. This minimizes the possibility of lead dust coming into contact with children when playing outdoors.

Maintain the Condition of Your Property. If you add new layers of paint when needed, inspect the water supply coming into your home, and keep aware of any news reports of possible lead contamination, you can minimize the danger.

Have Your Home and Property Inspected. If your home was built before 1978 and you do not know what paints were used at that time, then you should have it inspected for the presence of lead. This means contacting a professional company that has a stellar reputation and experience in identifying and removing lead from the home.

How Brickley Environmental Can Help

If you suspect that your home may be contaminated with lead, contact the professionals at Brickley Environmental. We have the knowledge and experience to identify and remove lead contamination that may be present. Over the years, we have worked with home and business owners just like you to ensure that their properties are safe from lead contamination.

Call our offices today and we will listen to your concerns, explain our services, and inspect your property at your convenience. At Brickley Environmental, we understand the dangers of lead contamination and what it can do to the health of those living or working on the property.

Open Windows Can Let in Fresh Air … And Surprisingly Lead too!

The recent events in Flint, Michigan have led many families to become concerned about the drinking water in their homes. However, they may be overlooking another source of lead that is coming in through their open windows. 

 Lead may still be present in the paint and wood of homes in the US that were constructed before 1978. Every time a window is opened, the fine lead dust is disturbed.  Children are especially vulnerable. They are closer to the ground and more likely to inhale or consume the dust that forms along the windows.

How to Address Lead in the Home

The first step is whether the home was built before 1978. This is a time when lead was legally used in paint. Lead gave paint considerable durability and it was cheap, so it was commonly used up until that year. if your home was built before that time, then consider having a professional service inspect and test the home for the presence of lead paint, even if it has been covered over for many years.

There are a few other materials in the home that may also be made with lead. This includes certain toys, jewelry, and imported candies. Continued exposure can build up the presence of lead over time. Here are some basic things you can do which may help reduce the lead exposure in your home.

Replace the windows.
Check the Water for Lead: Especially Hot Water.
Clean More Frequently: To Reduce the Amount of Dust.
Look for Peeling Paint: Underneath may be a source for lead.

There is no known treatment for the effects of lead-poisoning. Too much exposure may lead to lifelong health, cognitive, and behavior issues that can never be properly treated. This is especially true for children who are even more susceptible to the effects of lead poisoning. This means that cleaning and replacing windows may either not be enough or you may be looking in the wrong direction.

It is best to call a professional company that has experience with its identification and removal if you believe lead may be present.

Why Call Brickley Environmental?

Call the professionals at Brickley Environmental if you believe that lead may be coming into your home in the air or through the water pipes. They offer their extensive knowledge, years of experience, and complete training to identify sources of lead and remove it from the home, office, or facility.

Link Between Lead Exposure and Heart Disease

Since the 1970s, lead has been banned for use in paints, gasoline, and many other products because of its effects on the brain. However, its connection to heart disease has only recently been revealed.

A recent observational study from The Lancet Public Health Journal revealed that 256,000 cases of premature death caused by cardiovascular disease in the US may be linked to lead exposure. This new study defies the notion that low levels of lead exposure had little to no effect on premature death.

Presence of Lead and the Circulatory System

Lead exposure is linked to the hardening of the arteries, high blood pressure, and ischemic or coronary heart disease. Lead exposure occurs because lead has not fully been removed from some of the paints, fuel, and plumbing of structures, especially from older homes and buildings.

Most of the premature deaths caused by lead exposure affected those middle-aged, roughly 44 years old and older in the US. While exposure to lead products has been greatly reduced over the past few decades, it has yet to be eliminated from most of the western world.

Of the participants from The Lancet Public Health Journal study, those who had the highest levels of lead in their systems tended to be male, less educated, more likely to smoke, and have additional health complications, such as diabetes or hypertension. In addition, 37 percent of the participants who had the highest levels of lead were more likely to pass away prematurely compared to similar individuals with a far lower presence of lead in their systems.

Overall, the study concludes that 256,000 premature deaths might have been avoided if the levels of lead in their systems were at normal levels. Across age, sex, and health lines, the presence of lead has a substantial effect on the health and wellbeing of the body and mind. In addition, the study calls into question the assumed safe levels of lead in terms of its link to cardiovascular disease.

How Brickley Environmental Can Help

If you believe that your residence or business may have lead paint or materials made from lead, please call the experts at Brickley Environmental. We have the knowledge, training, and equipment to safely remove the lead from your home, office, or facility.

The Importance of Lead Exposure & Removal

While lead exposure rates in the US have dropped considerably since the mid-1970s, recent events demonstrate that residents are not totally removed from the issue. Since the 2016 lead contamination and water crisis in Flint, Michigan, it has been discovered that thousands of other communities in the US suffer from lead exposure rates even greater than those documented in Flint.

This new awareness of the presence of lead has caught some off-guard, considering that the substance was banned from products for decades. However, many older structures, such as homes and commercial buildings, still had lead in the paint, plumbing, and other areas.

History of Lead Usage

For many decades, lead was used across a wide range of industries. Its abundance, malleability, inherent strength, low melting point, and low corrosion levels made it perfect for pipes, paints, fuels, cosmetics, and more. It wasn’t until the mid-1970s that the abundance of data from studies that lasted for decades caused lead to be removed from manufactured products.

Although lead has been banned from paints, fuels, and plumbing, many older structures still contain products made from lead. In addition, lead is not easily detectable because it has no taste, unique color, or odor. This means that you may be exposed to lead without knowing of its presence. It takes accurate testing of the water, soil, dust particles, and more to determine if lead is present.

No Safe Levels

Lead has been known as a toxin for a long time. The presence of moderate amounts of lead in the system may have dire health implications that mostly concern brain activity. Lead exposure can cause emotional and behavioral issues along with affecting the intellectual development that stunts the growth of children.

Furthermore, recent studies have shown that the presence of lead may lead to premature death due to cardiovascular issues. As many as 412,000 deaths related to the circulatory system may be attributed to the presence of low levels of lead in the system. For children, the presence of lead is devastating as it stunts the growth of the body, brain, and metabolism.

How Brickley Environmental Can Help

If you suspect that your home, office, or facility has lead or the structure was built before the mid-1970s, please contact Brickley Environmental. We have the right tools to identify and remove sources of lead and other contaminants from the home, office, or facility.

Detecting the Presence of Lead in Food

Lead is a toxic element that is naturally present in the water, air, and soil. Even small amounts of lead can be dangerous, especially to children. Lead inhibits the proper development of the brain, which in turn can affect speech, emotion, and cognitive ability. In addition, recent studies have demonstrated a link between lead and premature death due to heart disease.

New concerns about lead in food have surfaced in India where instant noodles, a popular food consumed by tens of millions of people, may contain lead. While the possibility of lead being present is alarming, food makers, such as Nestle, have argued that the level of this toxin is well under safe limits. These food makers argue that the presence of lead is naturally present in the soil at less than 2.5 parts per million and that no lead is added to their food products.

Is There a Safe Level for Lead?

The counterargument to Nestle’s position is that no amount of lead in any food is safe. Prolonged exposure to lead, even in low amounts, contains serious health risks over time. This is especially true for children who over their lifetime will absorb four to five times the amount of lead in their systems compared to adults.

The presence of low levels of lead can lower the IQ of children and cause behavioral issues. High levels of lead affect the central nervous system along with the brain, which may lead to serious health complications that include death. Surviving such exposure still leads to complications that may include damage to the liver, kidneys, and other parts of the body.

Signs of Lead Poisoning

Early indications of lead exposure can be difficult to detect simply because there are no symptoms in the early stages. By the time the symptoms do appear, the poisoning may be considerable. Most of the symptoms in children and adults involve the brain and having behavioral problems, delays in growth, issues focusing and learning, and memory loss.

There may also be abdominal pain, weakness, fatigue, diarrhea, pain in the extremities, and more. Lead poisoning is now connected to cardiovascular issues, such as high blood pressure and heart attacks. Whether you have any symptoms or not, testing for lead will provide some peace of mind in knowing whether it is present in your food or on your property.

Call Brickley Environmental

If you suspect the presence of lead in your food or perhaps on your property, call the experts at Brickley Environmental today. We have the knowledge, experience, and equipment necessary to detect the presence of lead and have it safely removed from your residence or business.